Ginger, Shell ginger, Torch ginger

From Cargo Handbook - the world's largest cargo transport guidelines website
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Infobox on Ginger, Shell ginger, Torch ginger
Example of Ginger, Shell ginger, Torch ginger
Ginger shell ginger.jpg
Facts
Origin -
Stowage factor (in m3/t) -
Humidity / moisture -
Ventilation -
Risk factors See text

Description / Shipment / Storage / Risk factors

Scientific Name and Introduction

Alpinia zerumbet, Alpinia purpurata. The ginger flowers represent a range of species and genera from the tropics that include the plants producing the edible ginger rhizome. One of the common lei flowers used in Hawaii is white-ginger. Torch ginger flowers are spectacular spikes of red flowers that give an especially tropical impact in arrangements. The genus is named after the Italian botanist Prosper Alpinus.

Quality Characteristics and Criteria

No specific maturity standards have been developed for these flowers. They are normally harvested when all flowers on the spike are open. Make sure flowers do not exhibit chill damage symptoms such as off-coloured (greyish/bluish) blooms.

Grading and Bunching

There are no specific grade standards for gingers. Proper maturity and freedom from flower and foliage defects would be important indicators of quality. Gingers are large flowers and are therefore normally packed individually. Some species may be individually sleeved to protect the delicate petals.

Ethylene Sensitivity

These flowers do not appear to be particularly sensitive to ethylene.

Pretreatments

There is no evidence that pre-treatments provide any benefit to ginger flowers.

Storage Conditions

Store at 12,5°C to 15ºC. Gingers are chilling sensitive, so they must be held at warmer temperatures.

Packing

Gingers are packed flat in standard or insulated fibreboard boxes.

Special Considerations

Their large size makes them difficult to manage. Since insects sometimes make the trip from grower, wholesaler to retailer, make sure flowers are inspected and any insects removed.


Sources used
BMT De Beer’s Consolidated Manual on (Dutch) Flower Bulbs, cut flowers/greens and potted plants